Tag Archives: film

On Culture: War Child Film Festival 2017

The CultureJukebox team are passionate about doing good and great films, so it was brilliant to be contacted by War Child, the charity for children affected by conflict, that’s launching its inaugural War Child Film Festival.

The event is in partnership with Everyman Cinemas and combines cinematic previews and premieres with live events, Q&As, panel discussions and performances; all to raise money for children whose lives have been torn apart by war.

The eclectic programme will include special events curated by bands, radio stations, record labels, cultural publications as well as live performances, DJs and more. It takes place in venues across London from the 25 September to 6 October: www.ourscreen.com/warchildfilmfestival

Highlights include an exclusive screening of Purple Rain, providing an opportunity to watch the legend Prince’s Acting debut in the awesome East London rave-den Oval Space.

For those who want to keep their finger firmly on the pulse the screening of the UK Music Video Awards preview showcase at the Ham Yard Theatre combines exclusivity and eloquence in equal measure.

The festival will also host special events such as DJ sets and parties curated by the acts and cultural publications across the festival including artistic collective Last Night In Paris, who will also be performing live at Everyman Screen on the Green.

The festival will culminate in a screening of Floating Points’ ‘Reflections – Mojave Desert’ and a closing party in collaboration with Dance for Refuge at the CLF Art Café in Peckham’s Bussey Building.

War Child has a rich heritage in innovative musical partnerships and has been harnessing the power of music to change lives since 1995 with the launch of the HELP Album.

100% of the profits from the tickets sold will fund War Child’s crucial work providing protection, education and longer time livelihood solutions to some of the world’s most vulnerable children.

War Child works in seven countries including Yemen where the conflict has had devastating consequences for children there. There are shortages of food, medicines and vital supplies and more than 2.2 million children are malnourished.

Follow the news via the hashtag #warchildfilmfestival

On Film: Spoof Sleuth Mindhorn is the main Manx

One of the comedy film highlights of 2017? It’s certainly up there in the opinion of the CultureJukebox team..

Mindhorn is from the esteemed Mighty Boosh alumni, and it shows. It’s got a twisted, rooted and distinctively British sense of humour.

The premise has shades of Bergerac, and a few nods to Alan Partridge – but still feels fresh and original. In short, a washed-up actor, who previously played a top TV detective, is called back to the Isle of Man to solve a real-life crime. A murder enquiry no less.

Mindhorn sees this as his opportunity to get back into the big time. But, obviously, not all goes to plan.

Co-writers, regular collaborators and stars Julian Barratt and Simon Farnaby joust from beginning to end. Always great value, some of the scenes are as unpredictable as the Isle of Man’s weather. It’s a pretty mad film  in all honesty, but one that knows its audience.

Barratt is in the middle of everything. If you like his work, you’ll love this film. Particularly his fondness for capoeira.. But there’s something that stays with you in this picture. It explores fear of failure, the sense of opportunities missed and bad decisions made. Relatable.

Final hat-tip to the Isle of Man, which does look (perhaps surprisingly) wonderful in this film. It’s out on DVD on September 4th. Buy it from HMV here.

 

On Culture: Floating Cinema comes to South Ferriby

The CultureJukebox team really believe in democratising film, so it’s great to read about the Floating Cinema making a move from London and reaching a series of interesting locations around England.

The stop-off in South Ferriby, North Lincolnshire, piqued our interest – with the floating cinema stopping off on the beautiful River Ancholme to screen all-time Hollywood classic Sunset Boulevard.

The Floating Cinema, 2016 Image: © Hydar Dewachi

The Floating Cinema is led by Up Projects and is being supported by the Canal & River Trust for In Dialogue. This is a free programme of feature films, documentaries and a newly commissioned artwork entitled On the Bench by Leeds based artist, Harry Meadley.

The Floating Cinema, Sunset Boulevard, South Ferriby tour stop

The commission is a series of eight short films by Meadley featuring interviews with individuals that live and work in the eight waterway locations where The Floating Cinema will stop.

The Floating Cinema tour begins on 1 July 2017 and ends on 13th August 2017 – visiting Sheffield, Rotherham, Swinton, Doncaster, Thorne, Goole, South Ferriby and Hull.

For more information and tickets click here.

On Visual Arts: The Infinite Mix

Last week we were invited to see The Infinite Mix in Central London, here’s what we made of it.

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The Infinite Mix brought a sense of space, spectacle and wonder to London. A much needed injection of  creative ambition, ideas and energy to a city in dire need of colour and fun in the post-truth “age of anxiety”.

A collection of works by blockbuster film and moving image artists, the show took place in the middle of a building site – dust and rubble was around many corners.

The Infinite Mix was a Hayward offsite exhibition, organised in collaboration with The Vinyl Factory. Here’s a few of our highlights:

Ugo Rondinone, THANX 4 NOTHING, 2015, film still. Courtesy: the artist, Galerie Eva Presenhuber and Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York/ Brussels © Ugo Rondinone

THANX 4 NOTHING, 2015 © Ugo Rondinone

Ugo Rondinone’s immersive video installation features legendary beat poet John Giorno performing THANX 4 NOTHING. In this poem written on his 70th birthday, Giorno looks back at his life – and the people and events that shaped it – with humour and compassion. Performing in a tuxedo and bare feet on an empty stage in the Palais des Glaces theatre in Paris, as well as in a brightly-lit TV studio, Giorno gives thanks to ‘everyone for everything,’ before speaking frankly on the death of friends and lovers, sex, betrayal and his frequent periods of depression.

This installation was funny, warm and full of love. The artist’s admiration for another artist is clear, the stories and humour leaping from stage to screen and enveloping the viewer. A beautiful piece that is impossible to forget.

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Work No. 1701, 2013 © the artist.  c/o the artist, Hauser & Wirth

Martin Creed’s work often focuses on a single movement or gesture. In Work No. 1701a range of individuals cross a New York street, accompanied by a jubilant pop song written and performed by the artist. Talking about the film, Creed has commented that ‘doing things in life, living and working, is always using your body’, and that ‘life can look like a dance’. Work No. 1701 is a celebration of the act of getting from A to B, as well as the different ways in which people move through the world.

Creed, who has been writing songs and leading a band for over 20 years, describes his music and his visual work as an ‘attempt to make something for the world’. As he explains, they both stem from the same place: the desire to ‘say hello, to try to communicate somehow.’

Martin Creed’s piece was about movement and place – taking the viewer out of themselves and asking people to understand different location, dance and what makes people people.

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© DACS, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin

In the holographic illusion OPERA (QM.15) Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster appears in the guise of legendary soprano Maria Callas (1923–77). Dressed in the singer’s signature red dress and dramatic makeup, the artist lip-syncs to arias from Cherubini’s Medea, Verdi’s La Traviata and Ponchielli’s La Gioconda. Situated at the end of a derelict corridor, and encountered from a distance of 30 metres, the luminous figure is at first startlingly life-like – an impression reinforced by the strength of Callas’s voice.

OPERA (QM.15) is influenced by the development of photography, early cinema and the interest in the uncanny shared by many 19th-century artists and writers. It is related to a larger body of work that Gonzalez-Foerster began in 2012: an ever-expanding ‘fragmented opera’ consisting of live and recorded performances in which she appears as a range of fictional or historical figures. To Gonzalez-Foerster, each performance – including her turn as Maria Callas – is not theatre, but rather ‘a kind of séance.’

The technical quality of the Gonzalez-Foerster installation was superb, capturing attention and imagination as people explored the building. The haunting sounds and beautiful holographic colours prove to mash together sound, space and time together. A unique experience that questions the nature of both art and performance. Wonderful.

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We’re limited by time what we can say about The Infinite Mix. First of all, it was a pleasure and a privilege to see large scale art and video in Central London. Let’s hope for more in 2017!

Secondly, we came away thinking about the title and the grouping of artists. What is really infinite? I think it’s modern culture, with its remixes, reinventions and technology opening up ever more outlandish ideas and ways to tell stories. And of course, these are mixed across countries and across cultures. But this “Infinite Mix” means we have a challenge, we only have finite time and an even smaller attention span – where does the great work go in The Infinite Mix?

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