Tag Archives: Creativity

On Creativity: Found In Translation

The CultureJukebox team always have their ears to the ground for exciting young creative people looking to work cross-discipline – so we’re really looking forward to London College of Fashion’s new exhibition Found In Translation.

It’s coming to the progressive House Of Vans space in Waterloo, open between February 16th and 26th.

Found In Translation

Found in Translation is a dynamic showcase of work from the School of Media and Communication Postgraduate courses at London College of Fashion, UAL. The eight day exhibition showcases new graduating talent with work from courses MA Fashion Curation, MA Fashion Journalism, MA Fashion Photography, MA Fashion Media Production, MA Costume for Performance, MA Fashion Cultures and Graduate Diploma in Fashion Media Styling.

This exciting interactive and multi-disciplinary exhibition will be combined with a series of related events, talks and workshops that spotlights a new generation of talent from fashion and music, style and talent.

image c/o House Of Vans

Highlights from the running programme of events include;

PERSPECTIVES ON FASHION CURATION
Friday 17 February | 4 – 7pm
Presented by the Centre for Fashion Curtion at LCF, an evening of talks, films and panel discussions to explore the practice of fashion curation from multiple perspectives. Bought to you from LCF’s Fashion Curation team, this will be an opportunity to dig deeper into the importance of this discipline in the context of fashion narratives, history and preservation.

CELEBRATING FEMALE FASHION IMAGE MAKERS
Sun 19 Feb | 12.30 – 1.45PM
An increasing number of fashion’s image makers are female and making waves in this once male dominated world. New graduate talent from London College of Fashion including Clara Giaminardi and Camilla Glorioso will present their work and discuss the relevance of gender in fashion photography.

KATHRYN FERGUSON ON FEMINISM AND FASHION FILM MAKING
Sun 19 Feb | 3.00 – 5.00PM
Selfridges in house film maker and LCF researcher, Kathryn Ferguson’s work has throughout her career explored female identity and representation. Through fashion film, Ferguson is able to speak with mainstream audiences and present thought-provoking messages. This will be an opportunity to see Ferguson’s work in the round and hear the film-maker discuss her unique perspective with Nilgin Yusuf. 

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF SUBCULTURES? WITH I-D
Saturday 25 February | 3 – 5pm
In an age of super-fast online transmission, do sub-cultures still have a chance to develop and grow? Two documentaries commissioned by i-D’s Talent Producer and LCF alumni, Declan Higgins will be screened and a panel discussion chaired by Caryn Franklin will examine the current state of global sub-cultures.

Other exclusive events planned include masterclasses on fashion photography, film making and styling, digital fashion and culture talks, film screenings, and panel discussions.

All events are free. For the full  programme of events please see the LCF website

 

On Arts: UK City Of Culture? Hull 2017 Makes It Mark

It was one of Hull’s best known voices that said: “Nothing, like something, happens anywhere”.

That was Philip Larkin, and this year *something* is happening in Hull – it’s the UK Capital of Culture this year and has a mind-expanding programme of events, arts and cultural happenings going on that is really going to put the Humberside city on the map.

On New Year’s Day thousands of people gathered to watch fireworks and a stunning multimedia installation to open the year of culture in the City. This brought to life stories of the city and its people from the past 70-years.

Image c/o Getty

Sean McAllister, a documentary filmmaker from Hull, said the Made in Hull event – would show the world that Hull has a remarkable hidden culture.

He said: “We’re finally going to share our secret. If you’re from Hull, we always knew we had culture, it’s just the world didn’t know, so the secret’s out. Finally we’ve had to let them in. In a way we’ve kind of had these doors up to keep everybody out of our culture.

Sean added: “It’s just for us, we’ve had it as a subculture but, damn it, we’ve finally had to open the door to the international world and let them in. They can come and see what we’ve been enjoying.” 

Image c/o Getty

From the devastating bombing during the second world war, to the disappearance of its fishing fleet in the 1970s due to the cod wars, to the decimation of its shipping industry, Hull has struggled during the last seven decades.

Officials hope Hull’s tenure as UK City of Culture 2017 will breathe new life into the city. It is the second city to be given this honour, following Derry-Londonderry four years ago. Hull was selected four years-ago from a shortlist which included Dundee, Leicester and Swansea.

I grew up a few miles outside of Hull and will be covering 2017 in some detail. Here are a few highlights to watch out for over coming months:

Voices Across The Humber, April 1st

This sounds like a fantastic introduction to the region’s character, through its unique voices.

Ours is a place with distinct DNA, inimitable character and high spirits – a true energy estuary. Rich in history and talent, both banks of the Humber will come together to perform an exciting choral, orchestral and visually stimulating concert celebrating our region’s proud maritime heritage.

Led by Hull Choral Union, one of the area’s longest standing and best loved choirs, the show will unite choirs aged 7 to 90, renewing old partnerships, forging new relationships and connecting communities from across the river.

Flood, Feb 1st to October 1st

This experimental performance works with the city’s unique geography and brings to mind some of the recent heartbreaking disasters in and around the region.

image c/o Hull 2017

An epic adventure about the end of our world, set in the future, told in many parts.

Flood is the story of what happens to Hull when the waters come.

Slung Low makes adventures for audiences outside conventional theatre spaces, each with a powerful, moving story at its heart. Their political, mythical and explosive storytelling has wowed audiences nationally, transporting them to new worlds and making them see familiar places afresh.

Flood is the company’s most ambitious and experimental project to date, using live performance, special effects, digital manifestations and other platforms to tell a story across an entire year.

Back To Ours, Feb 22nd to Feb 25th

As part of the celebrations there’s creativity coming to every corner of the city.

There’s a buzz in the air as we bring award-winning shows to every corner of Hull, with big names sharing the stage with familiar and favourite local artists. We’re transforming venues in the heart of local communities; from schools to shopping centres, there’s a festival hotspot right on your doorstep.

We’ve got something for everyone as we shine a spotlight on comedy, music, circus, theatre, cabaret, dance and film. There are stories that will bring a tear to the eye, belly-laugh jokes, magical moments and even a bit of puppet nudity. So what are you waiting for?

Bring a friend. Bring your parents. Bring your kids.

Heck, bring everyone Back To Ours.

COUM Transmissions, Feb 3rd to March 22nd

A subversive exploration of the Hull-formed artists who challenged societal conventions.

Explore the life of COUM Transmissions in the first exhibition of materials drawn from the personal archives of Cosey Fanni Tutti and Genesis P-Orridge. Live events organised by The Quietus will trace the conception and legacy of COUM, combining music, talks and discussions among original COUM members.

Founded in Hull during the late 1960s by artists Genesis P-Orridge and Cosey Fanni Tutti, COUM Transmissions was a collective whose work confronted, subverted and challenged societal conventions.

Labelled ‘the wreckers of civilisation’ by a Conservative MP following COUM’s Prostitution show at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts, the group’s end in 1976 heralded the formation of the musical collective Throbbing Gristle.

 

Mind On The Run – The Basil Kirchin Story, Feb 17th to 19th

Another experimental ambient happening – inside the mind of a post-war sonic genius.

Image c/o Anna Bean

What connects the first British rock’n’roll discs of the 1950s, Vincent Price and The Abominable Dr. Phibes, the Nagra tape recorder and the industrial sounds of the north? The answer is Basil Kirchin.

Basil Kirchin is the forgotten genius of post-war British music. His remarkable life stretched from the days when British dance music mutated into rock’n’roll, through a headlong succession of film scores and pop songwriting, before retreating to Hull, where he created sonic landscapes that still challenge convention while seeking out an increasingly reclusive existence until his death in 2005.

A pioneer of musique concrète described by Brian Eno as “a founding father of ambient”, Kirchin’s intriguing history represents a collision of popular and experimental musical cultures that predate and define much of the music we hear today.

A live music festival celebrating the legacy of Hessle Road’s creative genius.

John Grant’s North Atlantic Flux: Sounds From Smoky Bay, TBC

A four-day music festival celebrating the best in Nordic creativity and influence taking over Hull city centre.

Hull goes international as it celebrates the city’s Nordic links in this experimental music festival.

Critically acclaimed singer-songwriter John Grant will curate a brand new, experimental music festival celebrating Hull’s Nordic and international links, while exploring the best in sonic creativity as part of Hull UK City of Culture 2017.

A host of Nordic and international artists are coming to the city over May Day bank holiday weekend, including Icelandic electronic dance collective GusGus, Norwegian multi-instrumentalist, DJ and producer Lindstrøm and Wrangler, a project that brings together Stephen Mallinder of Cabaret Voltaire fame, Phil Winter from Tunng and John Foxx collaborator Benge.

Fila Brazillia’s Steve Cobby and acclaimed writer Russ Litten have teamed up for a unique musical journey. In 1968 three trawlers from Hull sank off the coast of Iceland within two months of each other. 58 Hull men died. There was one survivor. Combining Litten’s prose poetry with Cobby’s soundscapes they will perform four commissioned pieces to reflect the experiences of trawlermen. Making a ghost ship out of words and music and bringing their fore-fathers back home.

North Atlantic Flux: Sounds From Smoky Bay will feature a variety of electronica, contemporary classical, avant-garde and experimental music, as well as one-off collaborations. Venues around the city hosting the festival include Hull City Hall and Gate Nº5, with other venues to be confirmed. More details about performers and shows and what to expect at this major music event will be announced in due course.

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More than £30m is being spent on the year’s events and £25m has been invested in revamping the city centre and refurbishing the (brilliant!) Ferens Art Gallery and the city’s main theatre.

Other happenings planned for 2017 include a visit by the Turner prize and a much-anticipated one-off gig from David Bowie’s old backing band, the Spiders from Mars.

And it’s not just culture. The city recently secured a £310m commitment by the German-owned firm Siemens to build new offshore wind turbines in the city, creating up to 1,000 jobs. More information and ticket details are on the Hull 2017 website here.
 

 

 

 

On Visual Arts: The Infinite Mix

Last week we were invited to see The Infinite Mix in Central London, here’s what we made of it.

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The Infinite Mix brought a sense of space, spectacle and wonder to London. A much needed injection of  creative ambition, ideas and energy to a city in dire need of colour and fun in the post-truth “age of anxiety”.

A collection of works by blockbuster film and moving image artists, the show took place in the middle of a building site – dust and rubble was around many corners.

The Infinite Mix was a Hayward offsite exhibition, organised in collaboration with The Vinyl Factory. Here’s a few of our highlights:

Ugo Rondinone, THANX 4 NOTHING, 2015, film still. Courtesy: the artist, Galerie Eva Presenhuber and Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York/ Brussels © Ugo Rondinone

THANX 4 NOTHING, 2015 © Ugo Rondinone

Ugo Rondinone’s immersive video installation features legendary beat poet John Giorno performing THANX 4 NOTHING. In this poem written on his 70th birthday, Giorno looks back at his life – and the people and events that shaped it – with humour and compassion. Performing in a tuxedo and bare feet on an empty stage in the Palais des Glaces theatre in Paris, as well as in a brightly-lit TV studio, Giorno gives thanks to ‘everyone for everything,’ before speaking frankly on the death of friends and lovers, sex, betrayal and his frequent periods of depression.

This installation was funny, warm and full of love. The artist’s admiration for another artist is clear, the stories and humour leaping from stage to screen and enveloping the viewer. A beautiful piece that is impossible to forget.

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Work No. 1701, 2013 © the artist.  c/o the artist, Hauser & Wirth

Martin Creed’s work often focuses on a single movement or gesture. In Work No. 1701a range of individuals cross a New York street, accompanied by a jubilant pop song written and performed by the artist. Talking about the film, Creed has commented that ‘doing things in life, living and working, is always using your body’, and that ‘life can look like a dance’. Work No. 1701 is a celebration of the act of getting from A to B, as well as the different ways in which people move through the world.

Creed, who has been writing songs and leading a band for over 20 years, describes his music and his visual work as an ‘attempt to make something for the world’. As he explains, they both stem from the same place: the desire to ‘say hello, to try to communicate somehow.’

Martin Creed’s piece was about movement and place – taking the viewer out of themselves and asking people to understand different location, dance and what makes people people.

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© DACS, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin

In the holographic illusion OPERA (QM.15) Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster appears in the guise of legendary soprano Maria Callas (1923–77). Dressed in the singer’s signature red dress and dramatic makeup, the artist lip-syncs to arias from Cherubini’s Medea, Verdi’s La Traviata and Ponchielli’s La Gioconda. Situated at the end of a derelict corridor, and encountered from a distance of 30 metres, the luminous figure is at first startlingly life-like – an impression reinforced by the strength of Callas’s voice.

OPERA (QM.15) is influenced by the development of photography, early cinema and the interest in the uncanny shared by many 19th-century artists and writers. It is related to a larger body of work that Gonzalez-Foerster began in 2012: an ever-expanding ‘fragmented opera’ consisting of live and recorded performances in which she appears as a range of fictional or historical figures. To Gonzalez-Foerster, each performance – including her turn as Maria Callas – is not theatre, but rather ‘a kind of séance.’

The technical quality of the Gonzalez-Foerster installation was superb, capturing attention and imagination as people explored the building. The haunting sounds and beautiful holographic colours prove to mash together sound, space and time together. A unique experience that questions the nature of both art and performance. Wonderful.

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We’re limited by time what we can say about The Infinite Mix. First of all, it was a pleasure and a privilege to see large scale art and video in Central London. Let’s hope for more in 2017!

Secondly, we came away thinking about the title and the grouping of artists. What is really infinite? I think it’s modern culture, with its remixes, reinventions and technology opening up ever more outlandish ideas and ways to tell stories. And of course, these are mixed across countries and across cultures. But this “Infinite Mix” means we have a challenge, we only have finite time and an even smaller attention span – where does the great work go in The Infinite Mix?

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On Visual Art: The World’s “Pinkest” Pink

The CultureJukebox team are big fans of the super creative Brit artist Stuart Semple, and his latest big idea is a good one..

.. he’s released his own brand of pink paint, ‘PINK’, said to be the world’s pinkest pigment.

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This is what the press release has to say:

PINK is available for £3.99 from www.culturehustle.com – to all but Anish Kapoor.

Artist Anish Kapoor famously acquired exclusive rights to use the world’s blackest black in his art. Developed by NanoSystems, ‘Vantablack’ is composed of a series of microscopic vertical tubes. When light strikes Vantablack, it is continually deflected between the tubes, becoming trapped. The pigment is currently the blackest substance known – so dark that it absorbs 99.96 per cent of light. 

Although originally developed for military and astronomic purposes, NanoSystems subsequently confirmed that Kapoor alone had been authorised to use the pigment for artistic purposes. And as Jonathan Jones began when he wrote on the subject for The Guardian, “Colour is precious”.

“It’s not really very fair! We all remember kids at school who wouldn’t share their colouring pencils, but then they ended up on their own with no friends. It’s cool, Anish can have his black. But the rest of us will be playing with the rainbow!” ~ Stuart Semple

PINK is a highly reflective and rich powdered paint pigment, which repels light to effect a powerful fluorescence. Semple intends to make his paint available to as many painters as possible.

Purchasers of PINK will be required to make a legal declaration during the online checkout process, confirming that: “you are not Anish Kapoor, you are in no way affiliated to Anish Kapoor, you are not purchasing this item on behalf of Anish Kapoor or an associate of Anish Kapoor. To the best of your knowledge, information and belief this paint will not make its way into that hands of Anish Kapoor.”

pink

On Culture: The Waldorf Project is back

The Waldorf Project: Chapter Three / FUTURO is returning to London in its biggest and most ambitious incarnation yet. Chapter Three / FUTURO will guide participants through the vast abyss, manipulating their emotions and responses in a genre-defying, multi-sensory experience – expressed in a universe of black and white alone.

One of the CultureJukebox team’s favourite London creative crews – this is a truly expansive immersive experience. Not to be missed.

The event is take place at Here East, London’s home for making, is – as a hub for entrepreneurs and pioneers of technology – the perfect stage for The Waldorf Project’s latest Chapter, presenting a world full of intrigue and wonder, unimaginable even to the most seasoned of Waldorf Project devotees.

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The Waldorf Project is staged under the concept of the Japanese emotion ‘AMAE’, meaning ‘a temporary surrender in perfect safety’. As in its previous chapters, The Waldorf Project unites the most pioneering practitioners in the worlds of environment design, product design, sound design, choreography, costume and textile design, and gastronomy, engendering through the birth of a new art form a rare synergy.

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Orchestrated and directed by artist Sean Rogg, the experience takes place between individual stages, or environments (each creating a new emotive synchronisation of taste, sound, touch and sight), participants will be immersed in the void of the cathedral-like sensation. Lost in the vacuum, they will be guided to move both as individuals and as a newly formed cumulative organism. Using exciting technologies and emotional manipulation, The Waldorf Project will explore new ways of implementing its algorithmic methods to manipulate the group, as developed in previous chapters; the ‘organism’, by interacting with its environment, will, ultimately, bring it to life and even learn to control it.

“We are not thinking beings that feel; we are feeling beings that think” ~ Antonio Domasio, Professor of Neuroscience, University of California

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“Those attending the experience will have their minds opened to the fanciful and phenomenal possibilities envisaged by preceding generations, before worldly pressures took over and stifled such thinking. By taking our guests on a journey, guided by their senses and interactions with hosts and fellow guests, we aim to satiate their inquisitiveness of these progressive worlds. Upon entering and experiencing Chapter Three / FUTURO, the environment we all live our daily lives in may seem a little humdrum to the initiated” ~
artist, Sean Rogg

The Waldorf Project: Chapter Three / FUTURO runs for nine nights, Thursday 10th – Sunday 13th November and Tuesday 15th – Sunday 20th November 2016.

For further information and for tickets visit www.waldorfproject.com

 

On Creativity: Create Syria – Imagining a better future in time of crisis

Peacebuilding charity International Alert is running Create Syria – a multimedia installation exploring how the arts can help imagine and build a better future in the wake of the Syria crisis.

And there’s just a week left to see this brilliant show.

It is curated in the atmospheric tunnels of House of Vans, Waterloo, London and uses film and sound to showcase the stories and works of several exiled Syrian artists and cultural figures living in Lebanon and working in diverse art forms such as theatre, film, painting, animation and music.

The featured artists have all been running workshops for displaced Syrian children and young people in refugee camps and other communities across Lebanon, using art to promote self-expression and collaboration. Their message is that Syria is not just about destruction and crises, but also re-growth and creativity.

Karim, a Syrian animator, wants to help young Syrian refugees to develop shared experiences through cartoons. He says: “Art presents the good and beautiful things in life, and encourages people to do the opposite of violence… It’s a coping mechanism, a way of dealing with the toxic context and the politics which is so complicated.”

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For her part, Raghad, a Syrian theatre and soap actress, is using drama to help young refugees learn new skills and regain a sense of purpose: “I want to make teenagers dream again”.

The exhibition was inspired by a project run by Alert in partnership with the British Council and the independent cultural organisation Ettijahat in Lebanon. It is curated by Ying-Hsuan Tai of Goldsmiths, University of London.

Charlotte Onslow, who co-ordinates the Create Syria project at International Alert, said: “We hope Create Syria will showcase the vibrant artistic scene alive among Syrian artists living in exile and highlight how creativity and expression is opening up space for wonder and calm in a time of crisis and the opportunity to imagine a future without violence.”

For more information, .

Our Neighbourhood: in praise of the Leytonstone Arts Trail

Was brilliant to attend the Leytonstone  Arts Trail this year – we spent a few days exploring wonderful exhibitions in some of the area’s most creative neighbourhood locations.

It featured the work of more than 150 artists, with exhibitions, open studios and community events around Leytonstone.

The team there are doing a fantastic job at building a new community of really creative and artistic people. Worth checking out the trail’s website to see what’s going on.

image c/o Leytonstone Arts Trail: ©Martine Charalambou
image c/o Leytonstone Arts Trail: ©Martine Charalambou
image c/o Leytonstone Arts Trail: ©Sue Mcqueen
image c/o Leytonstone Arts Trail: ©Sue Mcqueen