Tag Archives: coffee

Our Neighbourhood: Bare Brew opens in Wanstead

Wanstead is blessed with some of the best places to eat & drink in East London – and the offering has gone up a notch with this summer’s opening of Bare Brew.

Found at number 7 on Wanstead High Street, the cafe has a light and creative feel. More Shoreditch than Snaresbrook really! We’re big fans of the wallpaper (when you see it, you’ll know what we mean…), the super-cool paintwork and design.

Just hanging today…

A post shared by Bare Brew (@barebrew) on

Its owned and run by Gemma & Lisa; two women with a passion for coffee, fitness, arts & music.

So, what about the menu? It has awesome Square Mile coffee,  Hans Sloane hot choc, Tea & The Gang teas and daily smoothie specials. Food-wise; there’s tempting cakes, and changing brunch and lunch menus.

It seems like a great place to get some work done too. Has free wifi, USB ports and even offers pre and post workout snacks.  Kids are welcome, there’s board games etc and Bare Brew is really doggy friendly too. There’s plenty of treats for four-legged friends.

The CultureJukebox team will definitely be regulars here.. We think it’ll be a great place for late-opening and live-music too.. Watch this space! Find out more about Bare Brew here.

 

On Food: Zona N16 Opens in Stoke Newington – we try it out

The CultureJukebox team are fond of a delicious morning treat out on occasion, so it was great to hear about a new addition to Stoke Newington’s burgeoning breakfast cafe scene – Zona N16.

The space is a gastro-cafe by day, serving artisanal hot drinks and light bites brunch menu. Wines, cocktails and craft beers by night.

So, what did we think?

Zona N16 is right at the end of Church Street and about a 15 minute steady meander up from Dalston Kingsland.  Stepping in off the busy Stoke Newington High Street, the first thing that greets you is the sense of space and calmness.

It’s more impressive inside than out; nicely complimented by wonderfully friendly staff, with customers ranging from couples on dates, families enjoy a Sunday brunch out and hipsters-that-should-know-better cooking up something creative on their Macbooks.

 

Zona N16’s decor is superb, boasting clean lines and tasteful furniture with plenty of elbow room. A state-of the-art Kees van der Western coffee machine takes pride of place as you step in.

Q) What do you call a day without coffee? A) Depresso. ~ image c/o Zona N16

After a silky smooth cappuccino, it was time to place our order.

I went for Smoked Salmon Benedict, served on a fragrant croissant with mustard hollandaise and a sliced gherkin. It was served with avocado too. The salmon was full of flavour, the fragrant croissant was a unique twist on the brunch classic – this was a delicious portion of food. After running the Hackney Half Marathon the day before, I was hoping for a bit more carbs on the plate! But it was a truly delicious.

My significant other had the granola bowl and ordered the sourdough toast too. This was a lighter option, but really satisfying. The yoghurt was creamy, the granola had a true luxury crunch and the sourdough toast? Well, you’re in Stoke Newington. It just has to be done.

After lolling about, enjoying the atmosphere and great service we decided to order a dark hot chocolate drink as a pud. This was perhaps a bit too indulgent, but was a decadent finish to a sublime Stokey sustenance.  We’ll definitely be back!

On Sustainability: the ongoing coffee-cup waste campaign

As regular CultureJukebox readers will know,  we’ve been campaigning against coffee cup waste for a long time now.

So, it was great to read about Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall’s BBC News piece, here.

There are some eye-opening statistics in the piece. In his War on Waste campaign, Hugh estimates that 2.5 billion single-use cups per year go to landfill in the UK. But the problem is much bigger when we look beyond Britain…  With estimates of up to half a trillion manufactured, globally, over 100 billion single-use cups go to landfill each year. Starbucks, in the US alone, serves 8,000 cups per minute.

At CultureJukebox HQ we just received an email from an  innovative company called Ecoffee. It explains:

Due to the volumes produced, single-use cups are cheap and make up a miniscule percentage of the cost of a cup of coffee, which means a change to something more sustainable will impact on profits, and shareholders are averse to anything that does that. Starbucks has announced it will be “trialling” Frugal Cup – a recyclable single-use cup – in the UK. Whilst this is a step in the right direction, we don‘t believe it tackles the problem at the source. We can’t see how this will work in practical terms either.  Separation and non-contamination of recycling is the key and unless facilities exist, it will be very difficult to ensure such separation occurs, especially when dealing with cups that are taken off premises. Instead, and as is the current reality, cups will simply end up in general waste. In order to have any impact at all, coffee chains need to invest in special facilities – dedicated bins, dedicated waste recovery, dedicated recycling facilities – and pool resources to do it. Unfortunately, we can’t see this happening any time soon.

So, we think that rather than focusing on the recycling of single-use cups, it’s behaviour that needs to change. A bit like single-use plastic bottles, and more recently, plastic bags, it’s evident that it’s not that hard to change a few little things to help make a big difference. Reusable coffee cups are the way forward.

We’ve stopped drinking coffee from single-use cups. And you should too! The Ecoffee Cup is worth checking out. Made from biodegradable bamboo fibre and available in a wide range of designs, Ecoffee Cup is light, practical and resealable for easy storage in bags.

With a number of coffee shops and cafes offering discounts for those using reusable cups, it also saves money for the British coffee consuming public. The Ecoffee Cup team has set up the #stopthe100billion social media campaign in an attempt to raise awareness of the issue and effect real change in the way we consume coffee.